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. >> and in washington, msnbc and "time" senior political analyst, mark halperin. thanks so much, everybody, for being with us. >> morning. >> a very provocative, according to "the wall street journal," proposal that tim geithner brought over to the republican leaders yesterday. >> how'd that go? >> "the new york times" said it was, quote, loaded with democratic priorities and short on spending cuts. i'm just curious, it didn't go well. obviously, mitch mcconnell laughed at the offer, which i would have laughed at the offer, too. >> you would have laughed out loud at the treasury secretary? making a presentation? >> you know what i actually would have said? >> what? >> listen, we're all busy people. this is a critical time. if you're going to come over here and insult us and intentionally try to provoke us, you can do that. but i'm going back to work now. and i'd walk out. listen, this thing, $1.6 trillion of revenue, of new taxes, no specific cuts according to "the new york times" and "wall street journal." actually, $50 billion more in stimulus spending and no specific spending cuts. it was a nonsta
nugent, a columnist for "the washington times," pimps, wohors have a brat for welfare america. that was also a defeat for hate last night. >> it was a defeat with hate listen to the coalition this president has assembled through this election process. have you 93% of the of the latino vote. 70% of the asian-american vote. a majority of young, single women. i mean, it is an extraordinary coalition. look at the movement we made along the lines of progressive politics. you know, we have movement with the legalization of marijuana in a couple of states. that's less about people getting high and more about us addressing the injustices in our arrest too many substance abusers. look how many women are in the equality is put on ballots and vote the through. the question really is, can we continue to be behind this, can we continue to push this president and work with him in order to have the kind of effe? forget liberal versus conservative, just any government. >> john boehner, leader of the republican party, he spoke moments ago about the fiscal cliff. take a listen to h >> shoring
of the rnc, michael steele, in washington anchor for bbc "world news america," katty kay. >> "way too early" with bill karins. >> i'm going to say it again, a star was born. >> don't you think? >> i mean, just elegant, on the money. >> yes. >> glib in the right kind of way, gravitas, all there. >> i love it. >> awake. >> awake. >> that's always helpful. >> the guy who used to do it before, the tall guy, you know that one? >> a little droopy. >> rarely showed up for work. and when he did, it didn't look like he was all there, quite frankly. also, bill karins, of course, the big story of the day, the powerball. $550 million, something like that. did anybody buy a ticket? >> no. >> yeah. i did. but i'm still here which means i didn't win. if i did, out the door. >> 1 in 175 million chance. >> it's a loser's game. >> oh, steve. >> do you have charts? >> steve, what are you saying? loser? willie, didn't you? >> i did, last night. >> i will say an interesting sidebar, i used to do advertising for publisher's clearinghouse. without exception, the people that got the $25 million prize, destroyed th
situations like syria. >>> good morning from washington. it's friday, november 9th, 2012. this is "the daily rundown" i'm chuck todd. let's get right to my first reads in the morning. at 11:00, in the white house east room the president will speak to the nation for the first time since his election about what he hopes to accomplish before the end of the year. before taking on the new challenges though the president changed his campaign workers this emotional video from wednesday was released by the obama campaign. >> you guys have done, and the work that i'm doing has improved. i'm really proud of that. i'm really proud of all of you. and -- and what -- [ applause ] >> now it's back to governing. today the president will layout his marker for negotiations on the fiscal cliff. the combination of tax hikes and spending cuts that will kick in at the end of the year if nothing is done. a midnight december 30th, the bush tax rates will expire, the alternative minimum tax kicks in. more than half of married couples with two children will owe an additional $4,000 in taxes a year. and the 2011 tempo
. >>> how close? let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. president obama has got a spring in his step this friday before the election propelled by a good week on the job and 171,000 new jobs in this morning's report. he's out there in ohio fighting the good fight. i only make predictions when people make me make them, but the trajectory, the momentum, now seems pro-obama. pennsylvania will hold, ohio looks good but close, and all the battlegrounds look winnable for the president. the huge question is turnout, that and rational self-interest. the young who believe in science, women who believe in protecting their rights, latinos who can see a brighter future with a supportive president all need to get out, show up, and vote. there's no reward for a failure. in a free society, a democratic society is a failure, deeply personal, you blew it if you don't vote. let's see where it stands. i'm joined by mother jones washington bureau chief david corn and joy reid. do you think i'm a little strong? >> no. >> i don't want to talk to anybo
to your campaign, that's not change. that's old. that's the washington that needs to change. now, virginia, after four years as president, you know me. you know me. so, so, when you're trying to sort through this argument about change, you know, part of what you have to ask yourself is who do you trust? you know, when you're talking about the economy and policy that's so critical, you've got to trust. michelle doesn't agree with every decision i've made. there may be times when you're frustrated at the pace of change. i am frustrated sometimes with the pace of change. but you know i mean what i say. and i say what i mean. you know what i believe. you know where i stand. when i said we'd end the war in iraq, we ended it. when i said we'd pass health departmentcare reform, we passed it. when i said we'd repeal don't ask, don't tell, we repealed it. you know i tell the truth. and, most importantly, you know i will fight for you and your families every single day as hard as i know how. so let me tell you. i know what real change looks like. i've faugt for it. i've got the scars to prove it. an
think government shouldn't be involved with, for example, we don't think politicians in washington should be controlling health care choices. women are perfectly capable of making themselves. now, colorado, for eight years we had a president who shared these beliefs. his name was bill clinton. and his economic plan asked the wealthiest americans to pay a little bit more so we could reduce our deficit and invest in the skills and ideas of our people. and at the time, you may be surprised to learn that the republican congress and a senate candidate by the name of mitt romney said bill clinton's plan would kill jobs. kill the economy. turns out their math back then was just as bad as it is now. because by the end of president clinton's second term, america created 23 million new jobs. incomes were up. poverty was down. our deficit had become a surplus. so colorado, we know our ideas work because they've been tested. they've been tried. and we also know that the other folks' ideas don't work because they've been tested. after bill clinton left office, for most of the last decade, we tr
's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with simple, undeniable facts. the president of the united states has the right and duty to select the secretary of state, the person he thinks will best help him shape and project this country's foreign policy. just as important, the senate has the duty to advise and consent to his decision. if senators see a serious problem with a nominee, they have a right and duty to speak and vote that way. someone keeps telling the press that president obama prefers to nominate u.n. ambassador susan rice, and as long as that person is not the president and does so under ground rules that protect his or her identity, we are condemned to this preventative war we're watching in washington. one side attacking while no one outside the gates of the white house knows what the president intends. i take president obama at his official word. he has not decided whose name to send to the senate, and with that we go to the first of our two senatorial guests, senator bob corker, republican of tennessee. senator corker, i
deeper, that fact into this plot tonight. joining us right now is "washington post" reporter sauer ri horowitz, and david woods senior military correspondent for "the huffington post." give me a sense, i don't want people to get lost before we start, let me take may own shot at this, how the whole thing is put together. let's watch. the messy and complex web begins with david petraeus. in 2006 petraeus meets paula broadwell, a west point graduate and doctoral student after giving a speech at harvard. fast forward to may of this year. another woman, jill kelley, a friend of petraeus and his wife, begins receiving harassing e-mails. she asks a friend at the fbi to help launch an investigation. the e-mails it is eventually discovered are being sent by broadwell. the fbi also discovers that broadwell and petraeus have been having an affair. meanwhile, the fbi agent who kelley approached gross frustrated after he's kept off the case. his supervisors reportedly are concerned that he has, quote, grown obsessed with the matter. it's also uncovered that he has sent shirtless photos of himself
with a very busy day in washington and an array of meetings that would put your average speed dating event to shame. as we know, politics sometimes makes strange bedfellows. in this case one unusual lunch day. this afternoon the president hosted his vanquished rival, mitt romney. no word yet on if mr. romney found the cookies up to his rig rouse standards or how many white house beers the president decided to drink. we're also holding out hope that a savvy waiter or waitress caught at least 47% of the lunch on cell phone video. while in washington romney also met with his former running mate, the marathoner paul ryan, and offered a few kind words about him to the press. >> mr. romney, how was your meeting with mr. ryan today? was it nice to see him? >> that's a greet friend. good to be with him. >> good to be with him? >> always great to see paul ryan. >> while today's lunch was perhaps an opportunity to shake after a hard fought campaign, not everybody was feeling so friendly. take for example john bain mother earlier today slammed the president for campaign style events on the fiscal cli
politicians in washington to control health care choices that women should be making for themselves. so, wisconsin, we know what change is. we know what the future requires. we don't need a big government agenda or a small government agenda. we need a middle class agenda that rewards hard work and responsibility. we don't need a partisan agenda. we need a common sense agenda that says, when we educate a poor child, we'll a. be better off we need a vision that says we don't just look out for yourself. we look out for one another. we look out for future generations. and we meet those obligations by working together. that's the change we believe in. that's what this election's all. now, let's be clear. achieving this agenda won't be easy. it's never been easy. we always knew that. back in 2008, when we talked about change i told you, i wasn't just talking about changing presidents. i wasn't just talking about changing parties. i was talking about changing our politics. i ran because the voices of the american people, your voice, had been shut out of our democracy for way too long. by lobby
's play "hardball." >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. president obama has got a spring in his step this friday before the election propelled by a good week on the job and 171,000 new jobs in this morning's report. he's out there in ohio fighting the good fight. i only make predictions when people make me make them, but the trajectory, the momentum, now seems pro-obama. pennsylvania will hold, ohio looks good but close, and all the battlegrounds look winnable for the president. the huge question is turnout, that and rational self-interest. the young who believe in science, women who believe in protecting their rights, latinos who can see a brighter future with a supportive president all need to get out, show up, and vote. there's no reward for a failure. in a free society, a democratic society is a failure, deeply personal, you blew it if you don't vote. let's see where it stands. i'm joined by mother jones washington bureau chief david corn and joy reid. do you think i'm a little strong? >> no. >> i don't want to talk to anybody after this electio
'm in a bit of a food coma. i need to admit that. i may be slow. >> well done. and from washington, from "the washington post" newsroom, pulitzer prize-winning editorial writer for "the washington post," jonathan capehart. >> hello. i spent a long time on the road driving back from south hampton, but i made it in time. >> thank goodness. since andrew ross sorkin is adopting the bush policy of preemption, let's begin with him. >> okay. very good. >> what's at stake, obviously, a lot of posturing over the past couple of weeks since the election about the fiscal cliff. what is at stake here for both sides? what happens if they don't get a deal? >> well, look. i think what happens to both sides, it's not even what happens to both sides, what happens to us which is the collective, right? it's what happens to the country which is 4% of gdp disappears overnight. and that's what this is all about. by the way, it's not just about what happens january 1st or 11:59 the day before january 1st. it's already starting to impact the economy. whether it impacts consumers -- and we'll find out today, by the wa
are set to take place this week. in washington today, we heard both sides staking out their positions. here's democratic senator carl levin on "meet the press." >> the key is whether the republicans will move away from the rigid position which has been the grover norquist pledge that they signed that they will not go away for additional revenues. >> the gop rejecting the decade-old pledge. here's what norquist said about cham bliss. >> the commitment that he made to the people of georgia was not to me. it was to the people of georgia that he would go to washington to reduce government spending and reform government, not raise taxes. if he wants to change his mind and become a tax increaser so we don't have to reform government, he needs to have that conversation with the people of georgia. >>> >> and new today, congressman peter king on the controversy. >> i agree with chambliss. if i were in congress in 1941, i would have signed al declaration of war against japan. i'm not going to declare war against japan today. the times have changed. ronald reagan and tip o'neil recognized that i
. now that the elections are over, will washington do anything or will the town always on break continue to object structure, politicize and, of course, our favorite phrase kick that can down the road? the new washington is basically the same z the one before the election. the president is still obama, the senate is still solidly democratic and the house is republican, albeit by a small erma jort. three people in charge had this to say after the election. >> tonight you voted for action, not politics as usual. >> mr. president, this is your moment. we're ready to be led. not as democrats or republicans but americans. >> it's better to dance than to fight. it's better to work together. everything doesn't have to be a fight. >> i am looking forward to reaching out and working with leaders of both parties to meet the challenges we can only solve together. >> because the american people expect us to find common ground, we're willing to accept additional revenues via tax reform. >> legislation is the art of compromising and consensus building. >> despite all the frustrations of washington, i'
on the budget? live from the russell rotunda in washington, d.c., the independent bernie sanders of vermont. is this newly reelected president the same commander in chief that you saw in the past four years? we're hearing people like that comment. more testosterone. >> thomas, time will tell. but it is clear to me that the president must keep the promise that he made too to the american people. and that is not to do deficit deductions on the backs of the elderly and disabled veterans programs, and we are going to ask the wealthiest people in the country to start paying their fair share of taxes. that's what he told the american people. he won on that. many of us said the same thing. democrats won 25 out of 3 # senate races, and he has got to stick to that position. we will be right behind him on that. >> sir, you've been vocal and an advocate for the progressive agenda. what do you think the president can get done as a liberal? we talked about reducing the deficit, avoiding the fiscal cliff. where will the middle be met? >> on this issue, i think the american people spoke during the electio
on whether she even has the temperament to be secretary of state. that's a big question in washington, d.c. let me say it again. does susan rice have the temperament to be secretary of state? there are a lot of people, democrats who will tell you privately that just maybe she doesn't. but we're not talking about this. this is a clown show that's going on right now. what is -- >> i love that debate. >> well, the long game is unclear and the short game is even more unclear because they're not going to hold up the nomination of susan rice. i meaning if you look at the big picture. they only need to peel off -- i don't know what the number is five or six republican senators. >> who do they end up making stronger? >> they make the obama white house or susan rice look stronger but fighting the fight, three, four, five of them on a losing cause and won't hold up the nomination with four senators. >> it would appear that prior to yesterday that this was all a political passing storm that would get through this and speak behind closed doors and get through this or she would get through this but m
-seltzer on facebook. >>> they thought they had it. let's play "hardball." hi i'm chris in washington, let me start with this. when a political party gets beat the knifes come out, first you blame the candidate. next you blame the campaign just as easy. if you lose everything was wrong, like shooting fish in a barrel, blame everything. the hard part is figuring out the did you go too wide and thin or too narrow and tough? did you broad widely that you stood for nothing or did you circle the wagon so tightly that you left out country? the republican di immigration policy or too moderate? one thing you can never be wrong on. if you lose you can't brag. if you lose everybody gets it and nobody will admit she's wrong or he's wrong. both analysts joy, you first then john jump in. it seemse trial balloons for nextime 2016, the twotions in thes people like rubio, down in florida talking about t seven days of creatagain. then you've other endworld, you've got chris christie talking about how many days will it take us to c the mess secular real world and one off in the id world tha
. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. the hurricane and this president. hemingway called it grace under pressure, the highly educated call it good government. the american people who count the most call president obama's handling of tropical storm sandy positive. 4 out of 5 give him good marks as first responder in the crisis. the question before the election is whether this huge story about disaster and executive response is the last big one before we vote. is it the october surprise? the black swan that swoops out of nowhere and changes everything? as scarlet o'hara said, there's always tomorrow. chuck todd is nbc's political director and john heilemann is "new york magazine's" national affairs editor and an msnbc analyst. i guess that's my question to start, but let me give you this first. the president this afternoon bagged a big endorsement, new york mayor mike bloomberg, who is always interesting to watch. he cited the president's stance on climate change as the major reason. he writes, quote, one believes a woman'
of power." it's no longer forthcoming, it is here. and in washington, nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea mitchell. good morning, andrea. >> hi there. >> john heilemann, it's been such a long, long road since you guys started reporting on president barack obama -- then-senator barack obama's first election campaign in 2007. here we are five years later, a very emotional moment for the president who has endured five years of the highest highs and the lowest lows in politics. this has to be one of the most special moments for the man. >> undoubtedly. you know, it will be -- you think about the significance of him winning the first time, obviously, an historic moment. but in a lot of ways, you know, if he had lost on tuesday night, there would have been a lot of people who kind of consigned that victory to an accident. >> he would have been an aberration of history. >> almost re-election means as much and maybe in some ways more than the first time, you know. he's not a guy given to public emotion, displays of emotion. back in 2008
the way they are. we've seen over the last four years the status quo in washington they are powerful and they have fought us every step of the way. we've tried and succeeded in reforming our health care system. they spent millions trying to stop us. when we tried and succeeded in reforming wall street, they spent millions to push us back. we kept on going but those were tough fights. what they are counting on now is that you'll get worn down by all the squabble. you'll get fed up with the dysfunction. you'll give up on the change we fought for. you'll walk away and leave them to make decisions that affect every american. in other words, their bet is on cynicism but iowa you taught me to bet on you. you taught me to bet on hope. i'll work with anybody of any party to move this country forward. if you want to break the gridlock in congress you'll vote for leaders who feel the same way whether they're democrats or republicans or independents. the kind of iowa leaders you've always had. there's some principles you got to fight for. there are times where you got to take a stand. the price
ago, nobody foresaw. >> meanwhile back home in washington, congress is off for a week for the thanksgiving holiday, lawmakers are vowing to get to the bottom of intelligence questions in the immediate wake of the deadly attack of a u.s. consulate in libya, including whether ambassador susan rice's so-called talking points were altared the weekend after she gave that announcem of the attack. >> she didn't know anything about the attack in benghazi and the most politically compliant person. i don't know what she knew, but i know that the story she told was misleading. >> the debate on the hill intensified by general david petraeus' testimony friday that they suspected terrorism from the very beginning. >> why do you tell the american public something that is different in meaning? it should be perhaps leave out the details or the sources and then -- >> well, again, though, the details here were al qaeda. >> before you get to the question of what susan rice should or shouldn't have said, i think that we need to know the answer of who changed the talking points and why. >>
it. >> get over what? what are you talking about? >> all of you are in here. in washington, msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst, mark halperin. >> richard's in here? >> i don't know why. i'm serious. what's going on? also, look at this cast we have today, the author of "thomas jefferson, the art of power," historian jon meacham. is meacham here? meacham, look at him. >> lots of books. >> and willie, congratulations on your newest honor. >> thank you. are you in nashville, jon meacham? >> i'm in washington. going to be in nashville tomorrow. >> he needs a pipe in that setting. >> yes, he should, and a fireplace. >> you're saying donny's milking this thing. >> we talked about it for ten minutes. we got on the set and donny's, like, can we do this again today? >> unfortunately, joe and i are on what's called the decaying page. guys falling apart. we're on the presidential page. >> you look good. >> right next to brad pitt. >> that kind of ruins it. okay. well, there you go. >> okay, take that down, please. >> oh! >> there we go. >> it's too early for this. >> it is. ta
.m. and then 1:00 a.m., we'll have california, hawaii, idaho, oregon, washington, and then the last poll closing in alaska. unless this is a very strange night, those races will be interesting for governors races and senate and house races and state issues, but not necessarily for the presidency. unless things go very, very differently than expected to go. this is how your election viewing is going to unfold hour by hour on tuesday night. if you just exclude the states for the presidential race where everybody pretty much knows exactly how it's going to go and just the states where there is some question as to what's going to happen, here is a clip and save thing for you about these states. the battlegrounds. all right? states that you know are going to be important and everybody thinks they're going to be close. these are the states everybody is going to be watching on tuesday night. each of these states, as you know, has a top elections official. and each of these states has a top elections official who is a partisan. who is either a democrat or a republican. and in a democracy, that should me
would be most likely to blame washington and president obama. they're most likely to vote democratic. people who do not have jobs who are struggling and not earning sufficient income seem much more likely to gravitate toward a party with a safety net. people who have jobs and are doing well are more likely to be skeptical of government activity. >> thank you very much. it's the final 100 hours of the campaign. right now president obama and governor romney are both in ohio about to hold campaign events. up next we check in with the political panel. their thoughts on what we see playing you out. running into controversy, new york's decision to move ahead with this week's marathon has sparked a lot of backlash. >> the city of new york is talking about getting water out of the battery tunnel and prepares for a marathon. we're pulling bodies out of the water. >> we feel so strongly that this is the right thing to do for the city of new york, and that this can only be and must only be the starting place of our support. >> so what does your gut tell you? do you support the decision that the
? in a very important election. and you're going to tell me we can't do better than this? washington ought to fix this no matter who wins. maybe they're hoping the democrats just will go home. they don't want to wait in line anymore. joining me tonight, mitch sezer. he's also on the executive board of the democratic committee as a representative of the 14 southern states. i mean, it's great to have you with us tonight. but it just infuriates me when i see video tape like that. i mean, we vote like a third world country. >> well, welcome to ground zero. homeland of rick scott. i will expand the bid and tell you that folks who got online before 7:00, those people had a process by either midnight or 1:00 a.m. this morning. these are people who want their dmok, want the right to vote, and what's standing in their way, as you said, is governor rick scott. >> why is he doing this? why isn't he saying we're going to exhaust every effort we can to make sure there's democracy. i know the answer to it. i want to hear yours. >> it's obvious democrats do well in early voting. statistics prove it. also
on the outskirts of the washington metropolitan area in virginia and i was impressed by the methodical nature of what they did and also the distributed nature of what they did. in other words, everybody didn't come to headquarters. the materials, the lists, the walking lists and so forth were all in homes around the region. in other words, people in their individual homes and neighborhoods became the effective campaign headquarters for those areas. they have built on what they did in 2008. they do have a superb ground game. it's going to depend on them getting their own people out in all of these states. they have it divided in terms of types of voters. they have it divided by location. the analogy i use goes to the way the israelis operate in the desert. they don't have a lot of water, but they drop a droplet of water on every seed. the romney campaign theory is the older fashioned wave tv advertising, psychology, tie goes to the challenger situation. but it's such a closely divided country where everybody is microtargeting. maybe that old wave theory just doesn't operate anymore. certainly
. i think you guys have a poll out. the nbc washington "wall street journal" poll shows him up by six. you saw romney scrambling to try to change the narrative around the auto bailout. you have the car companies with saying he hasn't been truthful. the fact is four years ago, the unemployment rate was 12%. it's around 7% now. so they are looking at an economy that has improved over the last four years. it's hard for romney's campaign to gain traction there in talking about the economy being so horrible because the reality there is that it has improved. >> john, every credible poll shows romney behind in ohio. do you see it plausible he takes that state? >> the plausible scenario for mitt romney in ohio and other battleground states that are very close like florida or virginia, colorado, that sort of thing, the intensity, the enthusiasm for romney, the zeal of his electle electoral rat, te is built around enthusiasm and what the likely voters screens produce. what we're seeing nationally in our poll today is a 48%/47% race. there's a bit of a mystery to that. it's part art and part sci
is cut by half this year. 25 million people have already voted early in 34 states and washington, d.c. >>> and back to the frenetic pace on the campaign trail. both candidates have already held rallies in new hampshire, iowa, and wisconsin. >> you do want to be able to trust your president. you want to know -- you want to know that -- that your president means what he says and says what he means. after four years of president, you know me. you may not agree with every decision i have made. you may at times have been frustrated by the pace of change, but you know what i believe. you know where i stand. >> made a lot of promises, but those promises he couldn't keep. and the difference between us, he made promises he couldn't keep. i'm making promises i have kept and i will keep them for the american people. i have a clear and unequivocal message, and that is america is about to come roaring back. [ cheering ] >> joining me now, "washington post" columnist and msnbc analyst eugene robinson, marc caputo and mark murray. thank you so much, gentlemen, for joining. i got to bring eugene in
of trying to get things accomplished in washington. >> bill mcinturf and peter hart. the best in the business, the best poll and we're so happy and proud to have you and have you as colleagues, thank you very much. >>> mitt romney is touching all bases today, from iowa to ohio, where the campaign is going head to head with the obama team's ground troops, county by county. shawn spicer, shawn, good to see you. i want to ask you about the travel plans. the fact that the romney/ryan team going to pennsylvania has raised a lot of eyebrows, the democrats say it's desperation, because they know they can't win ohio, have to find some other route to 270. republicans in pennsylvania and elsewhere say it's a real campaign. and that there's a real possibility there. tell us what you're seeing on the ground. >> i think we're going to carry ohio. i think we got real shot at pennsylvania. so if you use their metric, the governor and paul ryan have been in ohio extensively over the last couple of days, they'll continue to be there in the last 48 hours that proves that we believe we think we'
're going to tell me that we can't do better than this? washington better fix this no matter who wins. maybe they are hoping the democrats will go home and they don't want to wait in line anymore. joining me now is chairman of the broward county democratic party on the executive board of the national committee as a representative of the 14 southern states. i mean, it's great to have you with us but it just infuriates me when i see videotape like that. we vote like a third world country. >> well, welcome to ground zero, which is south florida, homeland of rick scott. lee expand a bit and tell you that yesterday in broward, dade, and palm beach, folks that got online right before 7:00, those people are following a process by either midnight or 1:00 a.m. this morning, these are people who want their democracy, want the right to vote and are standing in their way. >> why isn't he saying, we're going to exhaust every effort that we can to ensure that there's democracy? i know the answer to that. i want to hear yours. >> it's obvious that democrats do well in early voting, also minorities tend to
to an end. but is this the last we'll see of the fiery floridian? good morning from washington. it's tuesday, november 20, 2012, and this is "the daily rundown." developing now secretary of state hillary clinton is already on her way to the mideast deepening involvement. clinton will travel first to jerusalem to meet with benjamin netanyahu and then to ramallah to meet with palestinian leaders and finally to cairo, egypt. the president was up late last night talking to netanyahu and mohamed morrissey. this morning chuck asked ben rhodes whether clinton is going because talks are stuck or a diplomatic resolution is close at hand. >> she is going because we've been in discussions with these leaders and we want to carry those forward. and obviously the center of gravity for those discussions is in the region. i don't want to predict what the outcome of those discussions will be. we know how difficult the situation is, how charged the issue of gaza is. we've seen conflict there in the past. so this is a difficult challenge. but, again, it's worth the effort of leaders from the united states in t
, whose effective tax rate as warren buffett reminds us is quite low. second of all, i think washington and the beltway is way out of touch with the american people on this issue. thomas, every single poll that i have seen says that we should ask the wealthy to start paying their fair share. one out of four major corporations pay zero in taxes. we're losing $100 billion every year because the wealthy and large corporations stash their money in the cayman islands. do you think we should go after ordinary people who are hurting in the recession or ask the wealthiest people and around large corporations to pay their fair share? the american people have been clear about this. this election told us something about this. >> senator, you say in your op-ed piece that congress must address the deficit situation and the fiscal cliff in a way that is fair. what proposal do you have moving forward knowing the way that the hill works right now? what do you think could work best to do something with that front? >> well, you see when you say knowing the way the hill works, what you're really saying kn
the time. the spirit of it is go out to the polls. the "washington post" has a pretty strong assessment of why this is so in some ways despicable on the national stage. the romney campaign thinks so little of the american voter at this point. that we don't need the specifics, that you can get away with these small attacks to obfuscate the larger message which is we don't know what romney is about, he hasn't taken questions from reporters and this is your closing argument? >> they've not only taken out an ad but they have repeated this almost half a dozen times today on the stump. what do you make of it? is this really a focal point now for the romney campaign and their closing argument of the american people? >> i don't think it's so much a focal point but a reemphasis, just sort of making the point as you saw in the rest of the clip there, the contrast, the president wants to talk about your vote being a matter of revenge and i want to talk to you about your vote being about america. so i think they were setting that up. i get the joke. if romney had used that word in the context of so
it comes to building different and better coalitions in washington, finding his own versions of moderate republicans to come with him. the question is, did he learn lessons if he wins a second term? and maybe are there better ways of building coalitions outside of washington, trying to go to certain places and certain states and trying to overperform in certain states. >> if he wins on tuesday night, he was able to get support because of things he did, killing bin laden, helping out hispanic kids brought to this country at an early age, these are things he did, the thing he did with governor christie the other day, these are actual doing things. >> i think the lesson is, if he wins one of the top two or three factors will be the auto rescue. that is key to ohio. if he keeps ohio, it's because of the automobiles and the fact that you can see automobiles on the street. you can see chrysler and dodge cars on the street. that's tangible and that is probably his best piece of tangible legislation. >> the one thing that you're getting at here, chris, what smir conish found out the hard way, th
editor of the grio and ryan grim, washington bureau chief for "the huffington post." joy, i want to go to you first in terms of the akin and mourdock races, these guys can't help but stepping in it and now it seems like the chickens are coming home to roost. >> thanks to crazy, democrats are going to hold on to the seat. thank you, crazy. i think it's good that these guys ran in the sense that it has ripped the veil off of something that particularly younger women, a lot of democrats either didn't know or didn't want to think about, which is that you have a hard core religious element within the republican party that does believe that women should not be making basic choices about their health care and that women have ruined the workforce for being in it. >> and women being dragged around by their hair and so forth? >> indeed. i'm predicting that mccaskill will do better than that margin. a lot of people say they are going to vote for republican but i have a pretty good feeling she is going to do well. >> ryan, it's amazing how it's turned the departure of senior leadership, the republ
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